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Undocumented and Unafraid

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Hello all you lovely followers of mine! I know it’s been a really long time since I’ve posted but I have something that I’m really eager to share with everyone! My freshman year of college (Fall 2013) I had to write a paper placing myself in the shoes of someone I couldn’t relate to. The assignment was called the Diversity Role and seeing how I never miss an opportunity to spread word about the DREAM Act, I wrote as though I was an undocumented immigrant. My professor was hesitant about my topic because it was “controversial” and a “political hot topic,” but I assured him I wasn’t going to offend anyone and that I knew what I was talking about. After I presented the paper to my class, everyone was so interested in it that I was able to answer a ton of questions and tell everyone about my experience volunteering with the Indiana Undocumented Youth Alliance. Here’s the paper that sparked a great discussion:

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Meeting Guero Loco

Guero Loco, on the right, is one of my idols for quite a few reasons. I first learned about him when I found out that he was going to perform at Fiesta Indianapolis in 2011. I was extremely intrigued by the fact that he’s Caucasian, yet he raps in Spanish. I just had to listen to this man with such a unique style and I loved every second of it. I went over to my friend’s house after listening to his songs & we were both dancing to them the rest of the day. When Fiesta Indianapolis finally came around, we ran to the front to see GL perform. He was accompanied by Alyssa B. singing the DREAM Act song (which I’ve posted a few times).

It was that performance right there that got me interested in the DREAM Act. So as you can see, Guero has influenced me a lot more than he knows. I loved how passionate he was about the DREAM Act. I could sense the conviction and sincerity in his voice. It was obvious that he really cared for the DREAMers. I loved how much energy he put into his performance and how the crowd reacted to him. I began researching the DREAM Act the second I got home and I am a very strong supporter of it today.

Guero Loco is heavily involved in the Latino community, not just in Indiana but all over, doing everything he can to support DREAMers. He didn’t just make a song about the DREAM Act, he’s actively working to encourage it to be passed. Actually, GL was recently involved with the sit-ins of President Obama’s campaign offices to urge the president to pass the executive order that would prevent the deportation of DREAMers.

Guero Loco with the North Carolina DREAM Team. President Obama’s campaign office closed the doors on the NCDT upon learning of their arrival.

He cares about these undocumented youth and he constantly posts updates on his Facebook page about immigration news and advice. Guero Loco is the first person that I learn news from and he always posts articles on his page. One thing that I can honestly say is that I have never seen him post anything negative. He provides excellent advice and he wants to- and has been- helping the community come closer together. So much can be achieved through a pure heart, determination, and good music!

I remember when I was voting for him to win the Chicago Music Awards and my friends told me that they didn’t know who he was. I grabbed my phone and started playing his songs before they could even finish their sentences. We spent the whole lunch period jamming to his music and they all voted for him. I was so happy for him when he won!

When I learned that Guero was performing at the first annual Indiana Latino Expo, I knew that I had to go. I wasn’t going to miss that performance for the world (Sorry world). My friend and I were walking around the expo when I saw that his booth was right next to us. I went over to it and we began talking. I bought one of his CDs and he autographed it for me! I did a horrible job of masking my excitement. He asked me if I was going to the concert later in the day and I eagerly replied that I was. I was so stoked that I could barely contain myself for these reasons:

  1. He had already known my name from Facebook.
  2. He autographed my CD.
  3. I finally bought the CD.
  4. I met one of the people who I look up to.
  5. I couldn’t wait to see him perform again.

To Sierra
Thank you for ALL of your support
GL

Guero Loco then introduced me to Malik Rain, one of the artists that he collaborates with and featured in the first photo on the left, and I learned that Malik also sings in Spanish. I thought it was so cool that none of us are Hispanic/Latino, yet we all speak the language and love it so much. I just love how they are so passionate about it that it helped to shape their music careers and interests. I was always told that I was ‘weird’ for speaking Spanish although I am African American, but the truth of the matter is that it’s not weird at all! Guero Loco, Malik Rain, and Alyssa B. all taught me that I can be exactly who I am and that my interests and the languages that I speak doesn’t change who I am on the inside.

By choosing to learn about another culture you choose to open your life up to a whole other world. Don’t be afraid, you have nothing to lose and everything to gain- GL

I had been waiting all day to see him perform and I was determined not to miss it. My friend and I were outside at a booth because she was trying to win a prize. I heard Guero’s voice inside and I quickly grabbed my friend and ran in. I took a seat in the front row and eagerly listened to them (I would post the video but the sound on my phone is horrible).

The songs that they performed:

My Swagga, Mi Brillo

Do You Feel Me

After the performance, I went over to Guero and Malik and asked them if we could take a picture together. I was bouncing off the walls when they said yes! After taking the picture, GL thanked me for all of my support, of both his music and the cause (the DREAM Act). It meant a lot to me for him to say that because of how heavily involved he is. My friend and I then walked outside and, as always, I turned on my music and began to dance. I hadn’t realized that Guero Loco and Malik Rain were walking to their van to get the equipment for their next performance. A few other people saw me dancing as well and one woman asked me to teach her how to dance bachata and salsa. I had so much fun! When Guero and Malik came back inside to head to the concert area, GL asked me again if I was going. I couldn’t wait! As we were walking to where the concert would be, we stopped because my friend’s mother called to check on us. When we began walking again, my mother called to tell me that she wasn’t far away and that I had to leave. OH MY GOSH! I quickly began walking to the concert area to try to see them perform at least one song. When we finally got there, I saw my mother pulling up. You can imagine my disappointment when I couldn’t see the performance. Although I couldn’t see one last song, I’m still super happy that I got to take a picture with him and get his autograph!

When we were going to meet up with my mom, someone asked me if Guero Loco was famous because he saw how excited I was to get a picture with him. I told him that I was a big fan and that I was really looking forward to seeing Guero perform. If you don’t know who Guero Loco is, I’m sorry to break it to you but you have been deprived. He’s not only an amazing artist, but he’s very intelligent, very caring, and very inspirational. He teaches you the importance of loving yourself and he gives young DREAMers the confidence to say that they are undocumented, unafraid, unapologetic, and unashamed. It’s obvious that Guero is not only a great musician, but also a great friend. He loves to help in whatever way he can. When he learns of a DREAMer facing deportation, he rallies up people to call the ICE and try to help. He brings DREAMers together, and by doing this he brings the community together. If we stand for nothing, we fall for anything but if we stand together, we can’t fall.

More from Guero Loco:

DREAM Act Song

Fanatica

My Pageant Speech- Education, Not Deportation

Every year, thousands of immigrants graduate high school with the hopes of furthering their education. Every year, thousands of immigrants are unable to go to college because they are undocumented. Each of those immigrants has a dream.

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